Rock Climbing and Surfing Airbnb Experiences with Wavehuggers

A surfer’s connection with the ocean is one that is indescribable. Surfers crave those awesome glassy sessions full of beautiful waves and long rides. Paddling out past crashing waves, bumping along in the lineup, riding the face of a wave, and occasionally losing your breath during an awesome wipeout session is what it’s all about. In addition to all of those aspects of surfing, it also allows for the ability to disconnect with the social media and technological world. Out in the water, nothing else matters and time slows down. Life is similar on a rock face.

Nothing compares to the adrenaline rush a climber gets from gripping small holds on a rock face and learning how to manipulate the body to climb to the top of a giant rock. Gripping tiny holds, making slow and deliberate movements, trusting your feet to stick to a rock face, feeling muscles in your hands and arms ache that you never knew existed, and occasionally holding your breath as you reach higher than comfortable to make the next move is what it’s all about. Rock climbing allows a climber to reach new heights and to literally see the world from a different perspective. The views never disappoint.

Both surfing and rock climbing allow for a unique experience outside connecting with nature. Both use upper arm and core strength and involve balance. Both require determination and commitment. The moment you paddle out into the ocean, you give up full control of the world around you and relinquish it to the waves. The same goes for a rock face. Once you start a climb, you’re committed, and all you can do is continue going up and enjoy the views. Both hobbies train the mind to be patient, train the body to connect with the ocean or rock, and train the soul to love another component of nature.

Wavehuggers is now offering Climb and Slide experiences where you can unite your love of both the ocean and the rock. Sign up now through AirBNB experiences here.

Comments are closed.

Main Menu

Wavehuggers